Should my adult child be my power of attorney or executor?

On Behalf of | Sep 7, 2022 | Estate Planning |

When you decide who should serve as your power of attorney or executor of your estate, it is tempting to simply believe your adult children are best able to fulfill these roles. And while this is true for some in Greensburg, there are situations in which someone other than an adult child should fulfill these essential roles.

Geography and availability matter

If you need someone to act as your power of attorney, you will want them to live near you. This makes it easier for them to advocate for you in medical situations or when handling your finances. Also, if your executor lives in the same state as you, it can make winding up your estate upon your death simpler than it would be for those who live out-of-state.

Choose your agents wisely

You will want to base your decision of who should serve as power of attorney or executor on elements that go beyond the arbitrary. For example, just because a child is your oldest does not mean they are best suited to serve in these roles. Other children or relatives may be better suited for these roles.

Also, it can help not to appoint multiple persons to the same role. This can lead to disagreements during critical times. Note that you can change these appointments during your lifetime, to address changes such as a death in the family that could affect these appointments.

Some people choose to have a professional fulfill the role of power of attorney or executor. This can help avoid family disputes. Also, professionals likely know the laws involved in the administration of your estate, making things easier for your heirs during what is understandably a difficult time.

Ultimately, you have choices when it comes to choosing a power of attorney and executor in Pennsylvania. You do not automatically must appoint an adult child to this role if another relative, friend or professional is better suited to fulfill this role. Knowing your needs ahead of time can help you choose those who will best advocate for you when you are no longer to advocate for yourself.

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